Waiting time: “gaps between the actual events”

In my Psychology of Time course I have offered students an assignment where they were exploring the experience of waiting time. They observed themselves in a situation of waiting and others while waiting for something in a public space.

Some very interesting observations and insights have emerged:

“Are the portions of time spent waiting truly just empty gaps between the actual events of one’s life, or are they also events in their own right? As I discovered while waiting at the bus stop, the time spent waiting for an event to begin can sometimes be even more valuable than the event itself.”

A very rare approach these days:

If the subway has not left the station yet while I am on it, I will tell myself that it is ok because now someone was able to make it on who needs to get to an important meeting.

Continue reading

DIS students: final projects FA15

Being an immigrant myself, Hamide‘s (Şeyda Özçetin and Seda Özçetin) story is very close to mine as well.. some very similar trials and tribulations… been a ‘proud’ alien in my own home-country for many years, then being pushed out due to economic conditions and been living here and there.. underemployment.. sure! been there, done that.. not only me, my mom as well – educated as a space engineer she currently works as a nanny in London. I’m not being deported though, but I’ve been in a situation when Italian mafia was hunting us… not a boring life for sure )) whatever doesn’t kill us, makes us stronger, or at least I hope so!

I’m happy that this project done by Julian Andrews , Megan Kessler, Kate Puglia, Laura McLaughlin, and Daisy Bowes Williamson as part of our cross-cultural psychology course at DIS is really out there now and hopefully it will bring some changes! Well done, “Jeg Danske!”, well done!

Immigrant, Fabulous and Proud of it

Academic writing: Introduction and Discussion

In most cases when I evaluate student’s papers or when I supervised my MA and PhD students, the two most common challenges are with the Introduction section or Discussion.

Academic writing: Introduction and Discussion

There are tons of useful information available on the internet about how to write the different parts of an academic paper. Recently I stumbled upon one, which I really liked, especially the short version of it:

The Sections of the Paper

 Experimental process  Section of Paper
What did I do in a nutshell?  Abstract
 What is the problem? Introduction
 How did I solve the problem?  Materials and Methods
 What did I find out?  Results
 What does it mean?  Discussion
 Who helped me out?  Acknowledgments (optional)
 Whose work did I refer to?  Literature Cited
 Extra Information Appendices (optional)

See the full guide here. Unfortunately I didn’t find who the authors were. And on another note, although this guide is from the biology department and they claim that in humanities papers are very different and it might be so. However, in social sciences we follow the same structure when writing papers (we really really try to be scientific, but I have my doubts).

Riin’s defence

Today my PhD student, Riin Seema, successfully defended her thesis: Mindfulness, time perspectives and correlates of well-being of students at different educational levels in Estonia. Dissertation is available here.

It has been a long journey and now it’s completed. Wish all the best to Riin!

IMG_20141215_150707 IMG_20141215_153737